ASK US

ASK US

If you've got something you'd like to ask, shoot us a question using the text box below and we will respond as soon as possible. As this is an Australian website for gay men and other men who have sex with men, we may not be able to provide the answers to questions not relating to this when we respond.

I'd like to be notified by email when the answer has been posted:

Submit

Sort By
I masterbabted with a HIV negative man using our spit for lube and briefly had oral, no cum but could taste pre-cum on his shaft what is my risk of HIV and what should i do Im married and my partner does not know that Im bi he indiocated t hat he was on preventive HIV anti virals
Hi. We aren't doctors here so can't provide medical advice. But we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, even in this case this is still classed as a low risk. Mutual masturbation is not a risk for HIV. We would always recommend anyone who is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs (including HIV), just to be part of an ongoing routine. You can search for locations to get tested around the country here: https://endinghiv.org.au/au/where-to-test/
I am a married guy who had a one off situation in a hotel 3 weeks ago, he ejaculated in my mouth, I do not know his status,(he did say he was inexperienced) now I have a sore throat. I am terrified and first experience with another male. What are my chances of not having been infected with HIV
Hi. We aren't doctors here so can't provide medical advice. But we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, this is still classed as a low risk. To address your concerns we recommend you get a full sexual health screen for all STIs (including HIV). This should address the anxiety you are currently expiencing. Here you can find by state and postcode contact details for clinics around the country: https://endinghiv.org.au/au/where-to-test/
Recently had unprotected oral sex with a stranger. He ejaculated in my mouth. Nothing suspicious at the time, but have been concerned of late, as I spat out the contents of my mouth and sometimes have bleeding gums
Hi. We aren't doctors here so can't provide medical advice. But we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, this is still classed as a low risk. We would always recommend anyone who is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs (including HIV), just to be part of an ongoing routine. Here you can find by state and postcode contact details for clinics around the country: https://endinghiv.org.au/au/where-to-test/
Hello, I was wondering if it\'s safe if an HIV NEGATIVE man can get anything from giving a BJ to another HIV NEGATIVE man?
Regular HIV testing is essential to knowing your status, and therefore understanding the risk of HIV transmission. There are a range of HIV tests around, and each one requires a different amount of time before it can detect an HIV transmission. The time for a test to be able to detect HIV is called the window period. In Australia, most laboratory tests (where blood is drawn and sent by your doctor to the laboratory for a result) use 4th generation lab tests that screen for both antibodies to HIV and antigen (the virus itself), and can detect if someone has HIV within 6 weeks of exposure. Rapid HIV tests, and some laboratory tests that use older technology, can take up to three months. That being said, oral sex is very low risk for HIV. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat. And this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. But this is still low risk. We are not aware of any cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex. Other STIs can be transmitted during oral sex. We would always recommend anyone who is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs (including HIV), just to be part of an ongoing routine. But remember, what you described does not sound like a risk for HIV.
i dad sex with HIV+ guy 10 weeks ago it was oral unprotected i was both with him after 50 day i was negative P24 antegine and today after 8 weeks im negative antibodies is that mean im will not be HIV +
Oral sex is very low risk for HIV. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat. And this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. But this is still a low risk. We are not aware of any cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex. We aren't doctors here, so we can't comment on specific tests. Here in Australia, most laboratory tests (where blood is drawn from your vein and sent by your doctor to the laboratory) test for both antibodies to HIV and antigen - these can detect if someone has HIV within 6 weeks of exposure. Rapid HIV tests, and some laboratory tests that use older technology, can take up to three months. This time for a test to be able to detect HIV is called the window period. If you have been tested after the window period of that particular test, and you have had no other risks for HIV in that time, it would be considered a negative result. You would need to ask your doctor what the window period is for your tests.
Hi I was tested last approx 10 months ago with a negative result, about 2 moths ago I engaged in receiving oral sex from a man who I\'ve just found out has HIV. I didn\'t even cum at the time and there was no anal penetration- I am in the process of being tested again but I\'m terrified that either I may have contracted something from him or vice versa as I don\'t know how long ago he was tested or how long this person he knows he\'s had HIV
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, we are not aware of any documented cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex, as you did. Other STIs can be transmitted during oral sex. We would always recommend anyone that is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs (including HIV), just to be part of a ongoing routine. But remember, what you described does not sound like a risk for HIV.
Four weeks ago I performed oral an a man who claims he is disease free. There was no cum. Am I at risk of catching hiv?
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, this is still classed as a low risk. Other STIs can be transmitted during oral sex. We would always recommend anyone that is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs (including HIV), just to be part of a ongoing routine.
I briefly sucked another guy\'s penis for 5 seconds maximum. When i tasted precum on my tongue, i got rid of it by licking the guy\'s skin. 31 days later, i went to get tested and the clinic used HIV Centaur Combo lab test and it came back negative. Can i move on? What is my overall risk in general?
Hello. We aren't doctors here, so we are not able to provide you with specific medical advice, or comment on specific tests you have had. However, we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, this is still classed as a low risk. Here in Australia, most laboratory tests (where blood is drawn and sent by your doctor to the laboratory) use 4th generation lab tests that test for both antibodies and antigen (the virus itself), and can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure. Rapid HIV tests and some laboratory tests that use older technology can take up to three months (though many don't take this long). This time for a test to be able to detect HIV is called the window period. You would need to check with your doctor about the window period for the test they used. But remember, what you described does not sound like a high risk for HIV.
Hi i gave unprotected oral sex to a transexual sex worker in sydney but she was from thailand,ive been tested for for all the main stds and all came back well, my gp ordered a hiv antibody test at 32 days which came back negative, i just wanted to know how accurate it would be at that stage as i am really worried, , can i expect a negative at my 6 week and 12 week test?
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, this is still classed as a low risk. The time it can take from if someone becomes HIV positive to when the test can detect it can vary depending on the test. Here in Australia, most laboratory tests (where blood is drawn and sent by your doctor to the laboratory) use 4th generation lab tests that test for both antibody and antigen, and can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure. Rapid HIV tests and some laboratory tests that use older technology can take up to three months (though many don't take this long). So the accuracy of the result in this timeframe may be determined by the type of test the doctor used, so it would be best to check with them about that. But remember, what you described does not sound like a high risk for HIV.
About 19 weeks I engaged in a low risk activity. I received oral from a female (CSW) with unknown status. I was tested for HIV on the following: Week 5 (36 days)- Advance Oraquick HIV 1/2 oral swab- NEGATIVE Week 7 (51 days)- Advance Oraquick HIV 1/2 oral swab- NEGATIVE Week 9 (62 days)- Advance Oraquick HIV 1/2 oral swab- NEGATIVE Week 11(78 days)- Advance Oraquick HIV 1/2 oral swab- NEGATIVE Week 12 (84 days)- Advance Oraquick HIV 1/2 oral swab- NEGATIVE Week 14 (99 days)- Advance Oraquick HIV 1/2 oral swab- NEGATIVE Week 15 (104 days)- 3rd Generation EIA HIV 1/2 AB screen w/ reflexes- NEGATIVE I know my anxiety is running wild and seeing someone. Am I conclusive and do not require anymore testing? Please advise. Thank You.
Although this is an Australian website for gay men and other men who have sex with men, we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, we are not aware of any documented cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex, as you did. We can’t comment on specific tests from other countries but all HIV tests do have window periods (the time it can take from if someone becomes HIV positive to when the test can detect it), and this time can vary. Here in Australia, most laboratory tests (where blood is sent by your doctor to the laboratory) can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but rapid HIV tests and some laboratory tests can take up to three months (though many don't take this long). So if your latest test was after the window period (which it sounds like it would be), and you haven't had any other risk events in that time, that would be considered a negative result. But remember, what you described does not sound like a risk for HIV.
I got semen in my mouth after kissing my boyfriend after he performed oral on another guy in a threesome we had. What are both of our risks? I had popped a pimple on the side of my mouth that morning, many hours before, (sorry for the visual) and a little blood came out for a few minutes then stopped- I\'m worried the opening in my skin from popping the pimple could have been an access point for the virus if the guy we had a threesome with was positive. Thank you.
Hi. What you've described would be a very low risk for HIV. Oral sex is considered a very low risk for HIV. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get semen in their mouth - but even if you you did get some semen in your mouth from the other guy this is still a low risk for HIV. Even with the popped pimple, it is highly unlikely this could be an access point for transmission, particularly as it had been many hours before. We certainly haven't heard of any cases of transmission this way. We do always recommend regular full sexual health check-ups (tests for all STIs including HIV) as a good idea for any sexually active person - just as part of an ongoing routine. You can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
I made out with a guy after he gave oral to another guy in a threesome. should I test for hiv in case semen from the guy who received the oral was still in the guys mouth who I made out with? Thank you.
Hi. What you've described would be a very low risk for HIV. Oral sex is considered a very low risk for HIV. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get semen in their mouth - but even if you you did get some semen in your mouth from the other guy this is still a low risk for HIV. We always recommend regular full sexual health check-ups (tests for all STIs including HIV) as a good idea for any sexually active person - just as part of an ongoing routine. You can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
what will happen when u suck a whit a HIV
Oral sex is a very low risk for HIV. There can be a risk to the person sucking if they have cuts or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and if they get semen in their mouth. But this is still a low risk for HIV.
Hi, I wanted to ask this because I\'m so scared, so I sucked a guys penis and I\'m scared of being infected, I was sucking him for a little, then he started jacking off and cumed on my face and after he cumed I suck his dick with cum am I still in risk or did Hiv die! In not sure if he was infected but I\'m so scared!
Hi. Oral sex is considered a very low risk for HIV. The risk is increased if there are cuts or ulcers in the mouth, or if there is cum in the mouth - but this is still a low risk for HIV. HIV does die quite quickly once it leaves the body. If you are still anxious about this, you could go to your doctor or a clinic to talk to them about getting tested if it will give you some peace of mind. HIV tests have a window period (the time it takes if someone does become infected to when the test can detect it) but the doctor can talk to you about that, and you can also talk more about your concerns if you wanted to. But remember, what you described is a low risk for HIV. Regular full sexual health check-ups (tests for all STIs including HIV) are a good idea for any sexually active person, just as part of a routine. You can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
Hi, I am a male who received oral sex from another male one month ago. I know from saliva there\'s no risk but I have no idea if he had bleeding or sores inside his mouth (didn\'t notice anything, but regrettably no idea). Since about two weeks ago, I have consistently felt like I may have a slight cold coming on, and also have strange skin changes (dry patches on elbows, flaky dry areas on my shoulder/upper back area, a reddish area/bump the size of a penny on my neck w/ what looks like a tiny dot on top with puss in it). These symptoms may be attributable to a heat wave passing through my city but I don\'t want to assume receiving oral eliminates risk of HIV. Should I test for HIV or are these symptoms realistically from something else?
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, we are not aware of any documented cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex, as you did. Regular full sexual health check-ups (tests for all STIs including HIV) are a good idea for any sexually active person, just as part of a routine. You can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ You could also have a chat to the doctor about the symptoms you're having while you are there.
I had oral sex with someone but I never put my penis in his mouth. we kissed but I had a cut on my upper lip when we kissed but it was only for one second. After I cummed, he licked the semen off my penis. Could I get hiv from him sucking off the semen from my penis? does the tongue carry hiv? can I get hiv when we kissed while I had a cut on my upper lip?
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission, and there is absolutely no risk of getting HIV from kissing. There is potentially a risk of HIV infection to the person doing the sucking if they have cuts, abrasions or ulcers in their mouth, or an STI in their throat; and this risk is increased if they get cum in their mouth, but still the risk is very, very low. Regular sexual health check-ups (i.e., tests for all sexually transmissible infections, including HIV) are a good idea for any sexually active person, just as part of a health sexual health routine. You can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
Hi, I am a male who received oral sex from another male. He performed oral sex on me for about 30-60 seconds three times, with mutual masturbation occurring in between. Do I need to test for HIV? I didn\'t notice any sores or blood on his mouth. Thank you.
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in their throat, and this is increased if they get cum in their mouth. We are not aware of any documented cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex, as you did. Mutual masturbation is considered a safe practice for HIV. Regular full sexual health check-ups (tests for all STIs including HIV) are a good idea for any sexually active person, just as part of a routine. You can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
exactly a week ago I had recieved oral sex from a girl. she says shes clean but for some reason I have been experiencing mild cases of a fever. such as a tight chest, dry throat, for a short amt. of time I had a very mild tenderness of the right side of my scrotum and an occasional sting of the tip of the penis. but at the moment I feel fine even though the tip of my penis is cooler than the shaft. and I am really eorried right now. that is my first time doing anything like that and im scared. and she had recently got her wisdom teeth taken out but her gums werent bleeding.
Although this is a website for gay men and other men who have sex with men, we can say that oral sex is considered a very low risk for HIV. There is potentially a risk to the person performing oral sex if they have cuts, ulcers or an STI in their mouth, or had recent dental work. This is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, we are not aware of anyone who received oral sex (like you) getting HIV that way. If someone does get HIV, some people get symptoms like a flu (fever, swollen glands, rashes, sore throat). But these are also symptoms of many other things, including the flu. If you are concerned about your symptoms, it might be worth going to the doctor to see what else it could be. It is a good idea for anyone that is having sex to get regular tests for all STIs, just as part of a routine. This website has a list of places you can get tested in Australia at: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ Although this website is for gay men and other men who have sex with men, most of the clinics listed see all people.
I’m male 31yrs I have unprotected oral sex with unknown girl on 23rd jun2014 she kiss may penis average 10 minutes so, I blow her mouth, i did not know she have mouth ulcer. After I wash my penis with water. After oral sex 21days passed in 21st July to today I have skin Rush itch in my arms, hands, stomach, and legs. elbow rush. Can you help me I’m so worries . I have headache also. But I was not use any medicine. So now Today the symptoms i think this is hiv symptoms. i have tyre in the night. so we did not have a rapid testing center in our state. im so worries i will be die soon because i live in tribal area
What you have described doesn’t sound like you were at risk of HIV. This is a website for gay men and other men who have sex with men, but we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person who has the penis in their mouth if they have cuts, ulcers or an STI in their mouth. This is increased if they get cum in their mouth. However, we are not aware of anyone who received oral sex (like you) getting HIV. If someone does get HIV, some people get symptoms like a flu (fever, swollen glands, rashes, sore throat). But these are also symptoms of many things including the flu. So it may be a good idea to talk to a doctor about your rash, as this could be something else and the doctor can help you. You can also talk to them about HIV if you are worried. It is a good idea for anyone that is having sex to get regular tests for all STIs. This website has a list of places you can get tested in Australia at: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ if that helps, but most doctors should be able to test for STIs.
Hi doctor, I had protected sex with a proatitute about a month ago, but performed unprotected oral, 3 weeks later I was feeling dizziness and weakness. I actually fell down one day due to my dizziness. I consulted doctor and blood test says low thyroid. I am worried about HIV Iinfection and if the thyroid happened due to the HIV infection. can you please help me out with this. thanks. I really appreciate for your advise; this worry is eating my all energy.
Hello, unfortunately we are not doctors here, so we cannot give medical advice. However, we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. If you are worried about HIV, you can talk to your doctor about getting a sexual health check, including an HIV test. There is a window period for HIV tests. This is the time it takes if someone becomes infected with HIV to when the test can detect it. Here in Australia, most tests done in laboratories can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but some tests that use slightly older technology can take up to three months. You should check with your doctor about the time for the test they use. If you are not comfortable talking to your doctor about sexual health, you can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ Although this website is for gay men and other men who have sex with men, most of the clinics listed see all people.

Acon's Commitment

One of the main ways ACON is committing to ending HIV by 2020 is through sustained advocacy efforts on behalf of our community as well as feeding information about the effectiveness of the ENDING HIV initiative back to the community… Read more.

Supporting Organisations

Sign up to our newsletter

Keep up to date on our latest news and content. Enter your email below to receive our monthly newsletter!

Thanks for signing up and being part of Ending HIV!