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Hi, I recently received oral sex from a man, he sucked my penis for 1-3 seconds. Is there a chance I have caught HIV? I don\'t know his status.
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. There is potentially a risk to the person giving the blow job if they have abrasions or ulcers in their mouths, or an STI in the throat, and this is increased if there is cum in the mouth. We are not aware of any documented cases of HIV transmission to the person receiving oral sex.
Where I can get Anonymous HIV test in Melbourne? If I don\'t have medibank card here....
Medicare cards are not required at public sexual health clinics in Australia (some will take them if you have one, but they are not required). You can search for where to get tested in your area (by suburb or postcode) at www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ This website lists both public sexual health clinics as well as private clinics and GPs, so double check with them if they require a Medicare card when you contact them.
Hi i met a random 11 nights ago, i heard she slept around,i was fairly drunk,i went down on her in the back seat then that was it, 1 week later my mouth is full of ulcers and bumps in my throat, throat isnt so much swallen just full of ulcers, i went to the doctor he done a swab test on me i have to go back in 3 days, at the moment im onto my 4th anti biotic tablet... Im obviosly worried iv caught something from her
Although this is a website for gay men and other men who have sex with men on HIV, we're not aware of what you've described as being a symptom of HIV or another STI specifically. However, the best thing to do if you're concerned is to check with your doctor and have tests if required, as you've done. They may also be able to talk to you about the symptoms you described and what they would indicate.
113 day after negative what are retest
HIV tests have what is called a window period. This is the time it can take from when someone becomes infected until a test can detect the infection. This can vary depending on the test a laboratory uses. Most people who’ve been exposed to HIV would test HIV positive within six weeks of exposure, but some can take up to three months. It is recommended that all sexually active gay men get regular full sexual health check ups, including an HIV test. To help you work out how often you should get tested, go to All About Testing page at http://endinghiv.org.au/test-more/all-about-hiv-testing/
Is 3 months 12 weeks 84 days . And is a negative duo test at 80 days conclusive
HIV tests have what is called a window period. This is the time it can take from when someone becomes infected until a test can detect the infection. This can vary depending on the test used. Here in Australia, most tests done in laboratories can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but some tests that use slightly older technology can take up to three months. You will need to check with your doctor what the window period of the test they performed is, if they didn't discuss this with you already. A negative or non-reactive result of a HIV test means you would be considered HIV negative from the window period before the test was performed (eg from 6 weeks or 3 months before the test). If you have not had a risk that could have exposed you to HIV during the window period, you would be considered HIV negative at the time of the test. If you are concerned about the time frame with the test, check with your doctor and ask them about the window period of the test they performed.
Is it possoble for a female who had sex with an hiv man can be hiv negative?
Although this is a website for gay men and other men who have sex with men in Australia, we can say that the possibility of transmission can be reliant on a number of things, including if the HIV positive person is on effective treatment. Different sexual practices also have different risks for HIV. Condoms offer the best protection. Testing is also important so you can know your HIV status. If you are in Australia, you can search for clinics to get tested at www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ (although this is a site for gay men and other men who have sex with men, most of these clinics see all clients).
I have had sex with a prostitute at her house. The condom broke while I was in her. this was a week ago. Now I am so afraid of what might be. I have been reading so much about the early sign of infection that I might be imagining being sick, or just getting stressed as I got the sniffles and the herpes on my lip came back too. This must be the first stages of HIV, right? I am going to get tested, next week but the unknowing and the what if is killing me.
If someone contracts HIV, shortly afterwards they may experience what is called a seroconversion illness, a flu-like sickness (though not everyone gets it). Symptoms of this (which may range from mild to severe) may include fever, rashes, a sore throat, and swollen glands. Though these symptoms are also common to other illnesses such as the flu. Although it varies from person to person, if someone has these symptoms they generally occur between 2 - 6 weeks after exposure to HIV. If you're not comfortable talking to your doctor about sexual health or would like to see someone that specialises in sexual health, you can search for sexual health clinics in your area here: http://endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ (although this site is for gay men, the majority of clinics listed here see all clients). The doctor can also talk to you about the risk associated with the particular event you are concerned about, and also about the window periods of HIV tests (this is the time it can take from when someone becomes infected until a test can detect the infection). Regular testing for HIV and other STIs is always advisable for anyone that has been sexually active anyway, so you can talk to the doctor about that while you're there as well.
i had sex with a women . 6 weeks ago not had sex since then. haf all test done for hiv and fullblood count test as well all came back negative and non reactive what does this mean. i have a wife and childrrn and worry about having sex with my wife
HIV tests have what is called a window period. This is the time it can take from when someone becomes infected until a test can detect the infection. This can vary depending on the test a laboratory uses. Most tests can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but some tests can take up to three months. You will need to check with your doctor what the window period of the test they performed is, if they didn't discuss this with you already. A negative or non-reactive result of a HIV test means the test has not detected antibodies to HIV, and you would be considered HIV negative from the window period before the test was performed (eg from 6 weeks or 3 months before the test). If you have not had a risk that could have exposed you to HIV during the window period, you would be considered HIV negative at the time of the test. If you are concerned about the time frame with the test, check with your doctor and ask them about the window period of the test they performed.
what are the risks of getting fisted without gloves?
Fisting can damage the lining of the arse, which allows for easier entry into the bloodstream. If the person fisting has nicks or cuts on their fingers, hands or arms (which may not be seen), this could allow for transmission between the partners. There is also a risk if there are multiple partners and the person fisting isn't using new gloves and washing their hands between partners, or sharing lube containers between partners. Using gloves for fisting is highly recommended to minimise the risk of transmission of not only HIV, but also other STIs such as hepatitis C.
how long does it take to develop symptoms and what are common symptoms
Shortly after contracting HIV, a person may experience what is called a seroconversion illness, a flu-like sickness (though not everyone gets it). Symptoms of this (which may range from mild to severe) may include fever, rashes, a sore throat, and swollen glands. Though these symptoms are also common to other illnesses such as the flu. Although it varies from person to person, if someone has these symptoms they generally occur between 2 - 6 weeks after exposure to HIV. It is important to remember that not everyone develops symptoms, so the only way to know your HIV status is to get tested. You can search for clinics to get tested for HIV and other STIs at: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ You can work out how often to get tested at: www.endinghiv.org.au/test-frequency-calculator/
I tested on march this year from a Vct witch is unknown ,I did a rappid test two lines appeared the other line was not vissible enought the first one was bold ,they said m possitive I ddnt go to the clinic to conffirm bcs I dnt trust them I have never got any symptoms infact since march I\'ve been gaining wheight more
Rapid HIV tests are recommended for screening but require confirmatory blood tests for diagnosis. If a rapid test indicates a positive result, it's important to follow up with a blood test to be sure. It's good to hear you are feeling healthy, however it's important to know that it's possible to have HIV and show no symptoms. HIV is a manageable illness if monitored and treated appropriately. Getting a definite diagnosis is the first step you should take and if you do have HIV your doctor will be able to suggest a range of options to support you and treat the illness. The following link has a list of recommended testing sites, all of which can link you to good medical care if you are HIV positive: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
met a guy whom he entered my anus without a condom a few time to relax me then had fullom intercorse with a condom
Great to hear you used condoms for most of the intercourse, but HIV is still present in pre-cum (the fluid that comes out of his cock before he ejaculates). Like cum, pre-cum can also enter your bloodstream through your arse, if he's positive. HIV is also present in the mucus that lines the bottom's arse and it can enter the top's bloodstream through the eye of the his penis or through tiny cuts on his cock. So using condoms for the all of intercourse is the best way to protect each other. For more on staying safe, you can go to http://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/ Regular testing is also important for sexually active guys. For more information on testing, you can go to http://endinghiv.org.au/test-more/
Hi. I had a very sexual relationship with my previous Girlfriend and we had unprotected sex everytime. This relationship ended 2 years back. Since the past 3 to 4 months I have been unable to get over a cold and seems like my immune system is at its lowest. Could this be a sign of me having HIV. Should I get myself tested. it is starting to worry me
Shortly after contracting HIV, a person may experience what is called a seroconversion illness, a flu-like sickness (though not everyone gets it). Symptoms of this (which may range from mild to severe) may include fever, rashes, a sore throat, and swollen glands. Though these symptoms are also common to other illnesses such as the flu. Although it varies from person to person, if someone has these symptoms they generally occur between 2 - 6 weeks after exposure to HIV. However, if you have been unwell for a time, it may be a worth going to see your doctor generally anyway. Regular HIV and STI testing is always advisable for anyone that has been sexually active, so it may be a good idea to talk to your doctor about that while you're there as well. If you're not comfortable talking to your doctor about sexual health, you can search for sexual health clinics in your area here: http://endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ (although this site is for gay men, the majority of clinics listed here see all clients).
Is this test considered conclusive at 8 weeks following a risk event? Test: ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo (CMIA)
Here in Australia, most tests done in laboratories can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but some tests that use slightly older technology can take up to three months. We aren't clinicians here, so it would be best to confirm with your doctor what the window period (the time it takes from when someone becomes infected with HIV to when the test can detect it) of the test they performed is, if they didn't discuss this with you already.
Does it mean that i have HIV because i had sex with more than 10 men and im gay?
The number of partners we have is a factor to consider when deciding how often to get tested. You can work out how often to test using the frequency calculator: www.endinghiv.org.au/test-frequency-calculator/ If you are unsure of your HIV status or you have had unprotected sex, it's important to get tested. For information on where you can get tested, check out: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
If I been exposed to HIV a few times and the person that exposed it to me had a undetectable viral load what are the chances of me testing positive even tho no ejaculation took place
If a HIV-positive person has an undetectable viral load, it certainly significantly reduces the chances of them passing it on. Ejaculation would increase the risk, but HIV can also be in other bodily fluids like pre-cum and the lining of the arse. You can find out more about what the risk is for different kinds of sex without condoms at: www.endinghiv.org.au/risk-calculator/ It's important to know your status by testing regularly. You can find out where you can get tested at www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
Hi ! Is there any risk of HIV infection from mutual masturbation, if on the glance of my penis I had superficial lesion and if the other guy had some of his precum on his hend ? How likely was to get infected with HIV ? Do I have to worry? Sorry for my English.
Mutual masturbation is considered a safe activity for HIV, and it would be unlikely for what you have described to be a risk for HIV. We would always recommend to anyone that is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs though. You can find where you can get tested at: http://endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/
I have had unprotected oral sex with (both giving and receiving) in the past few weeks. I never let any of them ejaculate into my mouth. Afew days ago I got a full STD screen and everything came back fine but my doctor said that I\'ll have to come back in 3 months to get a definite HIV result. Considering I only engage in oral sex and I tested negative to everything else, would you say my chances of contracting HIV would be relatively low?
Oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. This risk is increased if you have abrasions or ulcers in your mouth, or an STI in the throat, and this is increased if there is cum in the mouth. Based on what you have described, you would certainly be at low risk of HIV. The three months your doctor is referring to is the window period of the test (the time it takes if someone becomes infected with HIV to when the test can detect it). Depending on the test, this can take up to 3 months.
Hi doctor, I had protected sex with a proatitute about a month ago, but performed unprotected oral, 3 weeks later I was feeling dizziness and weakness. I actually fell down one day due to my dizziness. I consulted doctor and blood test says low thyroid. I am worried about HIV Iinfection and if the thyroid happened due to the HIV infection. can you please help me out with this. thanks. I really appreciate for your advise; this worry is eating my all energy.
Hello, unfortunately we are not doctors here, so we cannot give medical advice. However, we can say that oral sex is considered to be very low risk for HIV transmission. If you are worried about HIV, you can talk to your doctor about getting a sexual health check, including an HIV test. There is a window period for HIV tests. This is the time it takes if someone becomes infected with HIV to when the test can detect it. Here in Australia, most tests done in laboratories can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but some tests that use slightly older technology can take up to three months. You should check with your doctor about the time for the test they use. If you are not comfortable talking to your doctor about sexual health, you can find a list of clinics where you can get tested on the "Get a Test" page of this website: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ Although this website is for gay men and other men who have sex with men, most of the clinics listed see all people.
Hi. I had sex with a woman 4 weeks ago.she then mentioned that her previous male partner had hiv. She was with him 11 years ago.im worried she has hiv. Would symptoms have shown up by now ?
Although this is a site for gay men and other men who have sex with men, we can say that if someone contracts HIV, shortly afterwards they may experience what is called a seroconversion illness, though not everyone gets it. It is a flu-like sickness, with symptoms that can range from mild to severe and may include fever, rashes, a sore throat, and swollen glands. Though these symptoms are also common to other illnesses such as the flu. Although it varies from person to person, if someone has these symptoms they generally occur between 2 - 6 weeks after exposure to HIV. We would always recommend to anyone that is sexually active to get regular tests for all STIs. You can find where you can get tested at: www.endinghiv.org.au/where-to-test/ Although this website is for gay men, most of the clinics listed see all clients. They will also be able to talk to you about what your risk would be, ways to help prevent STIs, and how often you should consider getting tested for STIs. Also, HIV tests have what is called a window period. This is the time it can take if someone becomes infected with HIV until a test can detect the infection. This can vary depending on the test a laboratory uses. Most tests in Australia can detect if someone has HIV within six weeks of exposure, but some tests can take up to three months. You will need to check with your doctor what the window period is for the test they use.

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