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I had a lancet prick on 12/6/2019 so I got really worried and thus I tested on 3/25/2020 hiv ag/ab combo which was negative. is it conclusive?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after possible exposure to HIV. You can read more about testing and the window period on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ Your HIV test on 25 March 2020 happened 3 months after any possible exposure you were concerned with on 6 December 2019, which is pass the window period. This means that your negative result is conclusive. However, if you have continued to be sexually active, we recommend having routine tests for HIV and STIs with your doctor or local sexual health clinic.

Can someone transmit HIV to another person through oral sex precum if that person is undetectable and on medication?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Oral sex is considered very low to no risk for HIV transmissions. However, this can be different for other STIs, which are easily treatable. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have regular sexual health check-ups with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/. People living with HIV who are on effective treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) cannot transmit HIV to a negative person through any form of sexual activity. In fact, UVL is one of the most effective HIV prevention strategies along with condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/all-about-treatment/

Hi, its there a way I can get prep without having to go and see a doctor.

Hi, That’s a really good question. To access PrEP you will need to visit a doctor or health professional who specialises in HIV. They will need to have a consultation with you and test you for HIV to confirm you are HIV negative before they prescribe you PrEP. You will also need to have your consultation and HIV test every 3 months with your doctor in order to renew your scripts. If you are Medicare-eligible, the you can take that script to the pharmacy to pick up your PrEP at a subsidised cost. If you do not have Medicare, you can also buy generic versions of the medication online from reliable suppliers, which can be found on the PrEP Access Now website: https://www.pan.org.au/. You will still need your script from a doctor before purchasing. Although any doctor can prescribe you PrEP, it is important you are seeing a doctor who you feel comfortable talking about your sexual history with. If you’re looking for a doctor who can prescribe you PrEP or would like to ask more questions about PrEP before seeing a doctor, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone. The NSW STIs Programs Unit also has a list of gay-friendly GPs, which you can use if it is applicable to you: https://stipu.nsw.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/4.-Gay-Friendly-GP-List_February-2018.pdf

For how long does a person with HIV takes to die if he/ she starts treatment early?

Hi, Thanks for your question. People living with HIV who are on effective HIV treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) have much better health outcomes and cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person. Studies have also shown that starting treatment early, if not immediately after diagnosis, increases life expectancy, improves health and prevents serious illness by more than 50% compared to those who delay starting treatment. This means that people living with HIV who are on effective treatment can live healthy lives. You can read more about HIV treatment and its health impacts on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/tribes/hiv-poz-men/

i have p 24 antigen+antibodies test after 80 days of exposure can i consider it conclusive o i need further testing

Hi, Thanks for your question. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after possible exposure to HIV. You can read more about testing and the window period on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ We recommend contacting the medical centre that provided you your test to confirm what their window period is, and if your test at 80 days is conclusive. If you’ve continued to be sexually active, we recommend getting tested again and having routine sexual health check-ups with your doctor or local sexual health clinic.

Hi. I done oral sex with a massage worker.licking her vagina and kissing.after 6 months i get tested.antingen/ antibody and the result is not detected.is 6months is enought to get tested for accurate result?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Actually, HIV can not be transmitted through kissing, and oral sex is considered very low to no risk for HIV transmissions. However, this can be different for other STIs, which are easily treatable. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after possible exposure to HIV. Your test at 6 months sits outside of this window period, which means if your non-reactive result would be conclusive. You can read more about testing and the window period on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ However, if you’ve continued to be sexually active since then, we would recommend getting tested again for HIV and STIs. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have routine sexual health check-ups with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you have more questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Hi, male here had unprotected sex (vaginal). Tested at 89 days result: negative. Tested again at 120 days result: negative. Did not experience any “symptoms” since the unprotected sex. Would this been considered conclusive? Is a 6 month still necessary or is that outdated info? Original combo test was done at a clinic. Also, any risk from a hand job when saliva used for lubricant? Thanks

Hi, Thanks for your question. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after possible exposure to HIV. This would mean that your test at 120 days sits outside of this window period, meaning your negative result would be conclusive of your HIV status. However, if you’ve continued to be sexually active, we recommend getting tested again. HIV is also not transmitted through saliva, which means a hand job with saliva as lubricant has no risk for HIV transmission. However, this can be different for other STIs, which can easily be treated. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have routine sexual health check-ups with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you have more questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone

How l know l have Hlv

Hi, That’s a really good question. The best way to know your HIV status is to get a HIV test. There are a range of places you can go to get tested for HIV and STIs including at your doctor, your local sexual health clinic or a community testing site like a[TEST]. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/ We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs four times a year. If you have more questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone

I have sex out condom in 2017 l can have Hlv

Hi, Thanks for your question. Having unprotected sex with another person who’s HIV status you don’t know is considered high risk for HIV transmission. If you have not been tested since your 2017 when you had condomless sex, we highly recommend getting tested with your doctor or local sexual health clinic. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs four times a year. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/ Today, we also have many options for highly effective HIV prevention strategies. This includes condoms, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and undetectable viral load (UVL). We recommend considering one of these forms of protection in the future, and consulting with your doctor which option works best for you. If you have more questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.