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i am hepatitis b carrier but not active , my PCR test result is 2000 , my doctor told me i dont need to take any medication , my question is : can i take PrEp for preventing from HIV ?

Hi, Thanks for your question. People living with hepatitis B are still able to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV transmissions. For people living with chronic hepatitis B infection who are taking PrEP, AFAO recommends that their dosing strategy is daily PrEP and not on-demand PrEP: https://www.afao.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/AFAO-On-Demand-PrEP-Fact-Sheet.pdf If you are thinking about taking PrEP, we recommend consulting with your doctor or health professional who specialises in HIV and Hepatitis B to discuss if PrEP is an effective option for you and how to correctly use it. If you have further questions, you can call the NSW Hepatitis Infoline at 1800 803 990 where a person can answer your questions. You can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer further questions over the phone.

Hiv test after exposure 6,9,12,14 months nagetive but symptoms are present mouth ulcers, white patch, white tongue, weakness, fatigue, tonsillitis, neck lymph node,

Hi, Thanks for your question. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks and 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after you’ve been exposed to HIV. Your tests at 6, 9 , 12 and 14 months after your possible exposure to HIV sit outside this window period. This means that your negative results are conclusive for your HIV status. If you’ve continued to be sexually active, you will need to get tested again. You can read more about HIV testing and the window period on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ The symptoms you’re describing can be caused by many different things. We recommend visiting your doctor to seek further medical advice.

I last played unprotected sex with a girl who is HIV positive on 9 Feb and 25 Feb 2020. Having started experiencing signs and symptoms of HIV, I got concerned and went for testing in April, may and lastly in June 26 2020 and still I have tested negative. What is my stand in HIV status. Why am I still experiencing signs and symptoms of HIV up to now 4 July 2020. Does it mean I have the virus and still its hiding?.

Hi, Thanks for your question. People living with HIV who are on effective treatment can suppress their viral loads to such low levels we call it ‘undetectable.’ People living with HIV who are sustaining an undetectable viral load cannot transmit HIV to HIV negative person. However, if your sexual partner is not on treatment, it’s good to hear that you were able to go get tested to confirm your status. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks and 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after you’ve been exposed to HIV. We always recommend confirming with the medical centre what their window periods are. Your tests in the months of April and May may have been done during the window period after your possible exposures in February, which means your results may not have been conclusive of your HIV status at those points in time. However, your test on June 26 would happened after this window period, meaning your negative result then would have been conclusive. If you continued to be sexually active after 25 February, you will need to get tested again for a conclusive result. If you are experiencing symptoms, we recommend visiting a doctor who can provide you with further medical advice.

Could we get infected with HIV or STDs if we kiss the precum only for once and if the infected person suck our breast?

Hi, Thanks for your question. For HIV to be transmitted, it requires the bodily fluids (blood, semen, pre-cum, vaginal or front hole fluids, rectal fluids or breast milk) from a person living with HIV who is not on effective treatment to enter the bloodstream of a HIV negative person. This is often through sexual intercourse or by sharing injecting equipment. The risk of HIV being transmitted in the way you have described would be very unlikely to no risk. However, this can be different for other STIs such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea. If your body or hands are coming into contact with infected bodily fluids during sex, there’s a possibility you can transmit this to other parts of your body including your throat, urethra and arse. Sometimes STIs also show no symptoms but are easily treatable when detected. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs 4 times a year with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/ If you have further questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

HIV rapid test at 6 months non reactive. But I've had symptoms rash, sore throat, headache, fatique, hair loss, hair thinning texture. Could these be HIV symptoms. Even though my test is non reactive at 6 months.

Hi, Thanks for your question. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks and 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear after you’ve been exposed to HIV. Your test at 6 months sits past this window period, which means that your non-reactive result would be conclusive for your HIV status. However, if you’ve continued to be sexually active, you will need to get tested again. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs 4 times a year with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. The symptoms you’re describing can be caused by many different things. We recommend visiting your doctor and consulting with them for further medical advice.

Can I get hiv from going down on a girl.

Hi, Thanks for your question. Oral sex is considered very low to no risk for HIV transmissions. However, this can be different for other STIs, which are easily treatable. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs 4 times a year with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/. If you have more questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Is it harmful for someone with aids to swallow cum after performing oral sex on someone without aids?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Oral sex is considered very low to no risk for HIV transmissions. However, this can be different for other STIs, which are easily treatable. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have routine sexual health check-ups with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. Also, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is the virus that can be transmitted between people and weakens the immune system. People living with HIV who are not on effective treatment can have their immune systems damaged to a critical point which leads to AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), which makes them more prone to other infections and cancers. People living with HIV don’t automatically have AIDS, and with the advancements in treatments, most people in Australia living with HIV will never develop AIDS. People living with HIV who are on effective treatment can suppress the level of HIV in their bodies to an ‘undetectable viral load’ (UVL). People who are HIV positive and sustaining a UVL live much healthier lives and cannot transmit HIV to another person. Along with condom and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), UVL is one of the most effective HIV prevention strategies. You can read more about these strategies on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/. If you have more questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

I had a protected sex with a sex worker and after 3 months and 20 days I tested negative for HIV via rapid hiv test.Do I need to do more tests , I do not have any symptoms more than 10 months, but I am still anxious.

Hi, Thanks for your question. If you used condoms correctly as your form of protection during sex, they are highly effective in preventing HIV transmission. Rapid HIV tests have a window period of 3 months. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear in the test after your possible exposure to HIV. Your test at 3 months and 20 days sits outside this window period, which means that your negative result is conclusive for your HIV status. However, if you continued to be sexually active in this time, you will need to get tested again. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have routine sexual health check-ups and get tested for HIV and STIs 4 times a year with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you are experiencing anxiety around HIV, we also recommend talking to a doctor or counsellor who specialises in HIV who can provide you with any information and support you may need. If you have more questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

During the COVID19 and its restrictions, seeking sex has become almost relying on being totally inactive due to ISO etc. Now that the government removed it from the PBS listing, can an update on this website show other options which can be of a benefit?

Hi, Thanks for your question. If you’re referring to Truvada as PrEP, you’re right. Truvada is no longer on the PBS. However, Truvada is only one brand among many other generic versions which are just as effective. We’ve put together a blog article that gives you more information on how to access PrEP even though Truvada is no longer on the PBS here: https://endinghiv.org.au/blog/truvada-removed-from-pbs-what-about-prep/. You can also find a list of other generic PrEP versions which are listed on the PBS here: https://www.pbs.gov.au/medicine/item/11276L-11296M-11306C. If you are looking to access PrEP, we always recommend consulting with your doctor first who will discuss with you the correct way to use it and provide you with any medical advice you may be looking for. Also if you’re interested, ACON recently released a COVID-19 Update which provides messaging around the easing of restrictions, physical distancing and casual sex here: https://www.acon.org.au/about-acon/latest-news/#covid-19-update-easing-of-restrictions-physical-distancing-and-casual-sex If you have any more questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.