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Hi! I’ve just started PrEP, a week in now, and I’m just wondering if it’s OK to take cold and flu medicine / vitamins as usual when I need to? Thank you.

Hi, thanks for your question. In terms of taking other medications with PrEP, it is always best to discuss the specifics with a doctor or pharmacist. In general, most common over the counter medications (such as cold and flu tablets and vitamins) can be taken with PrEP. Nevertheless, it’s still always best to discuss with a doctor or pharmacist, just to be sure. If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

The risk calculator does not include an option for oral sex. If i never fuck without a condom but always perform oral sex on another man (give) what are my risks?

Hi, thanks for your question. In terms of HIV risk, oral sex is generally considered safe. For HIV transmission to occur, fluid containing enough of the virus (such as blood or semen) needs to enter your blood stream. Unless you had cuts or sores in your mouth, this is not really going to occur with oral sex. Other STIs, such as gonorrhoea and chlamydia, can be transmitted via oral sex, so it’s still a good idea to get tested every 3-6 months if you are having any kind of sex. If you’re based in Sydney, a[TEST] is a fast, free and confidential service for gay and bi men. You can find out more/book a test here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/book-a-test/. If based elsewhere in NSW you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624 to find a suitable clinic. If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

I am male and received oral sex from prostitute. Don’t know her HIV status. Do I need to go for HIV test?

Hi, thanks for your question. In terms of HIV risk, oral sex is generally considered safe, regardless of who you did it with. For HIV transmission to occur, fluid containing enough of the virus (such as blood or semen) needs to enter your blood stream. This is not able to occur when receiving oral sex, because saliva is not a fluid that transmits HIV. So, in relation to this encounter, it is not possible that you were exposed to HIV. Nevertheless, other STIs, such as gonorrhoea and chlamydia, can be transmitted via oral sex, so it’s still a good idea to get tested at least every 6 months if you are having any kind of sex (more often if you are having a lot of sex). If based in NSW you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624 to find a suitable clinic. If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Hi. If i don’t have Medicare Card,how can I get the PrEP? And last month i did the HIV test is Negative .

Hi, thanks for your question. If you don’t have Medicare the easiest and cheapest way for you to access PrEP is through self-importation. In order to access PrEP through self-importation, you will still need to visit a GP or sexual health clinic to get a prescription for PrEP from a doctor. If you visit a GP, you will need to pay the doctor’s consultation fee, which is usually around $70. If you visit a sexual health clinic, you may not need to pay anything, but it is best to check before attending. To find your nearest clinic, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624. Once you have gotten your prescription, you will need to order the PrEP from an online pharmacy. PAN is a great online resource which can guide you through the process of ordering PrEP online. Their website is https://www.pan.org.au/. If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

If one is using the same condom for oral first (~1.5 minutes) and then vaginal (~30seconds) sex, is there a risk that there could have been be abrasions / tears on the condom from the teeth which could cause a HIV risk during vaginal sex and warrant PEP ? Lube was used for vaginal intercourse so hopefully any tears weren't . I didn't check for tears afterwards, but went home and retested it (i.e. put a condom over a banana and saw if teeth could cause holes) and then poured some water through and there was small leaks when the condom was tied and squeezed. Then again I've read that this isn't an accurate way to test and that a condom would a small tear would have completely broken. Just a bit worried. Thanks and appreciate all you effort and time.

Hi, thanks for your question. In terms of HIV risk, what you have described would not warrant the use of PEP. Condoms are quite strong, so unless the woman was biting on the condom quite hard, it would be difficult to tear. You would most likely notice if she was biting hard enough to break the condom. Also, even with tears, what you have described would be considered very low risk. Nevertheless, if you are concerned or anxious, it may be a good idea to speak to a trusted doctor or sexual health nurse. To find your nearest clinic you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624 (if based in Australia) If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Is french kissjng a positive man safe for a negative man to engage in.

Hi, thanks for your question. In terms of HIV risk, kissing is definitely safe! For HIV transmission to occur, fluid containing enough of the virus (such as blood or semen) needs to enter your bloodstream. Saliva is not a fluid that transmits HIV, so kissing is not risky at all! If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Where can I get the "True" facts about PrEP. I have been told so much & a lot of it seams to be just false. I have other health issues and am on Meds for them so I need to know if PrEP will affect any of those & what the side effects are likely to be.

Hi, thanks for your question. You’re right that there are definitely a lot of misconceptions about PrEP! If you’d like to know some of the basic facts around PrEP, you can visit our info page here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/prep/ PrEP is generally well tolerated, however if you have any concerns about taking it alongside other medications, it’s best to speak to a trusted doctor at a GP or sexual health clinic. To find your nearest clinic, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624. If you have any further questions don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Hi, You guys are quite literally our saviours, keep doing the excellent job you guys are doing. I’m a straight male who had sex with a female (HIV status unknown) 4 months back without any protection for 30 secs max. I haven’t had any major symptoms other than occasional mouth sores. What is my risk?

Hi, thanks for your question. In terms of HIV risk, what you have described is considered low risk. Nevertheless, it’s a good idea to get tested at least once per year (more often if you are having a lot of sex). To find out where you can get tested you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624. As for the mouth sores, these could be due to a range of things, it’s best to speak to a doctor about them.

Hello there, on July 2017 i gave a blow job to a male escort with unknown hiv status, but he didn't ejaculate on mouth, after that we had mutual mastrubation, had been worried for hiv, so i got test for hiv with 3rd gen antibody rapid test with 3 different test on december 2017 (5 months after the exposure) the result was non reactive, then on february 2018 (7 monts after exposure) i gave my blood for donor on blood bank, and for procedure they screened my blood including hiv, and they told me it was non reactive, what if the person i gave blowjob was Poz for hiv could i be contractred with hiv from the scenario i describe.. Is it conculsive for the test i had been take..should i take another retest.. Thank you

Hi, thanks for your question. Firstly, in terms of HIV risk, oral sex is generally considered safe. For HIV transmission to occur, fluid containing enough of the virus needs to enter your blood stream. This is quite unlikely with oral sex, and virtually impossible if there was no ejaculation. The two tests that you received should be considered conclusive evidence that HIV transmission did not occur in this instance. The tests that are performed these days are very accurate. If it says that you are negative/non-reactive, then you can take that to be true. While you do not need to get tested again to confirm whether HIV transmission occurred in this instance, it’s still a good idea to get tested every 3-6 months. To find out more about where to get tested you can call the Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624. If you are based in Sydney, aTEST is a free, fast and confidential service for gay and bi men to get rapid HIV test and STI screenings. You can find out more about aTEST here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/book-a-test/