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What may be the problem when somebody had difficulty when urinating and at the end you see some blood coming out

Thanks for your question. Painful urination and discharge from your penis may be a sign of an STI, but they are not a sign of HIV. There are also a range of other conditions that could cause the same symptoms. You should see a doctor or sexual health nurse as soon as possible to discuss your symptoms and possible treatment pathways.

A few months ago I had sex and then three days later, I went on Prep. The required test to receive Prep came up negative (because it was only three days since I had sex). I have recently taken a HIV test. It has been three months (since the above incident) and it has come up negative. I just wanted to know if taking Prep would affect my results in any way since I am still unsure about that incident I had just before taking Prep. If it does effect the results, how long do I have to wait until I receive a conclusive result. Thank you.

The vast majority of HIV tests are conclusive after three months following a risk incident. In fact, some HIV tests have a window period of six weeks or less. For absolute confirmation, touch base with your healthcare provider who did your testing to confirm window periods, while it is highly likely the test is conclusive.

I have had an episode of receiving oral sex from a sexworker 7 weeks back. I have taken Pep in 52 hours for 28 days precisely. I have been reading a lot and have so much different information on insertive fellatio about hiv risk and making me crazy. I can see you have update your original answer from 2010 back in 2018 addressing risk as zero. Can you please confirm if the risk is really zero or just rhetorical? I am due to go for testing next week but really scared

Oral sex is considered extremely low risk for the transmission of HIV and from what you write, it sounds like you have done your research on the topic. Sometimes people can have an overwhelming sense of fear about acquiring HIV, a very treatable condition in 2019, and it can be after incidents they know to be low or no risk. If you feel you are having high levels of stress and anxiety related to acquiring HIV, reach out to a doctor or counsellor to discuss these feelings. You may need to “unpack” your anxiety with a professional to feel as good as you can about your sexual health.

What are the signs of HIV in a six weeks baby

Thank you for your question. Ending HIV cannot appropriately advise on this topic. If you feel you or your baby are at risk of HIV, the best person to speak to is a doctor. Treatment is incredibly effective in 2019 and can be administered at any age, so the most important thing for you to do is to test if necessary.

Hello im 25 years boy last 3 month ago i had sex with foreinger girl when i was sex i used condom but i freely oral sex with her like my penis in her mouth her vagina in my mouth ,kissing ,fingering ,i ve no any cut in my hand and lip but at that time i was suffering from tonsil and when i was fingering her same hand i was use condom in my penis so what are the risk thank you in advance

Hi and thanks for your question. Ending HIV is a platform that focuses on HIV and STIS in men who have sex with men and is located in Australia. These areas are where we are most knowledgeable and can be our most helpful. We can however share a few basic facts about heterosexual sex and HIV transmission. Kissing, hugging, hands and fingers do not transmit HIV. Giving and receiving oral sex is considered very low risk of HIV. Penetrative anal and vaginal without the use of an HIV prevention strategy is the most common way that HIV is transmitted sexually. As we previously mentioned, our website focuses on same sex attracted men but you can learn about HIV prevention strategies here (www.endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe). It is important that all adults who are sexually active test for HIV and STIs on a regular basis, between two and four times a year. Ask your local doctor about how often you should be testing. Finally, if you find that you are becoming overwhelmed with anxiety about the idea of acquiring HIV, you should consider speaking to a counsellor, sexual health clinician or a doctor about how to best manage these feelings.

I was having sex with escort from Colombia. I used a condom however we stopped cause she was in pain. The condom was still on. She offered to jack me off instead. She did not give me oral sex instead she would use a little of her saliva on her hand and would jack me off. I presently have herpes, I did have healing sore while she was jacking me off with her hands, again a little if her saliva on her hands for lubrication. Am I at risk if she did not do oral however used her hands and a little saliva to jack me off, again I had healing herpes sore but no oral was performed?

Hi and thanks for your question. Ending HIV is a platform that focuses on HIV and STIS in men who have sex with men and is located in Australia. These areas are where we are most knowledgeable and can be our most helpful. In the situation described above it is the female sex worker who is most at risk of contracting an STI, which in this case is herpes from you. Though we focus on gay male sex, we can however share a few basic facts about heterosexual sex and HIV transmission. Kissing, hugging, hands and fingers do not transmit HIV. Giving and receiving oral sex is considered very low risk of HIV. Penetrative anal and vaginal without the use of an HIV prevention strategy is the most common way that HIV is transmitted sexually. As we previously mentioned, our website focuses on same sex attracted men but you can learn about HIV prevention strategies here (www.endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe). It is important that all adults who are sexually active test for HIV and STIs on a regular basis, between two and four times a year. Ask your local doctor about how often you should be testing. Finally, if you find that you are becoming overwhelmed with anxiety about the idea of acquiring HIV, you should consider speaking to a counsellor, sexual health clinician or a doctor about how to best manage these feelings.

Hello, Will being on Prep affect my HIV results in any way? Thank you

PrEP is only available to people who are HIV negative, so we shall interpret your question to mean, how will PrEP affect your HIV test results? PrEP, when taken as prescribed (in Australia that is one pill taken once daily), it extremely effective at reducing the risk of acquiring HIV. It is important to take one pill once a day however. If you miss doses, the effectiveness of PrEP reduces and puts your more at risk of acquiring HIV.

Can i drink alcohol during my treatment oh hiv, and taking art

Many people who are living with HIV enjoy consuming alcohol. That said, this is certainly something you should speak to with the doctor who is providing your treatment. HIV medication can have an impact on some people’s livers in which case consuming alcohol would likely be advised in small amounts or not at all. This of course is highly individualistic and something that only your doctor can give you concrete feedback on.

Approximately six weeks ago, I had sex with a sex worker with a condom. As far I can tell condom was intact all the time, first she gave me oral with condom on and then she was on top of me for no more than 3 minutes with condom and I ejaculated outside. Just after the incidence, I reallized what mistake I had made and started worrying and then a mile pain in throat after 24 days made my anxiety worse. I will get my test results for hiv tomorrow. What do you think of my chances of having infeccted?

Hi and thanks for your question. Ending HIV is a platform that focuses on HIV and STIS in men who have sex with men and is located in Australia. These areas are where we are most knowledgeable and can be our most helpful. We can however share a few basic facts about heterosexual sex and HIV transmission. Kissing, hugging, hands and fingers do not transmit HIV. Giving and receiving oral sex is considered very low risk of HIV. Penetrative anal and vaginal without the use of an HIV prevention strategy is the most common way that HIV is transmitted sexually. As we previously mentioned, our website focuses on same sex attracted men but you can learn about HIV prevention strategies here (www.endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe). It is important that all adults who are sexually active test for HIV and STIs on a regular basis, between two and four times a year. Ask your local doctor about how often you should be testing. Finally, if you find that you are becoming overwhelmed with anxiety about the idea of acquiring HIV, you should consider speaking to a counsellor, sexual health clinician or a doctor about how to best manage these feelings.