Ending HIV Blog

Hepatitis A Outbreak in NSW

September 19, 2017

Hepatitis A is an acute infection (short-term but often severe) that causes inflammation of the liver. It’s not a very common virus in Australia, and most people reach adulthood without catching it.

What you need to know about Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A Update: NSW has seen a recent increase in cases of Hepatitis A transmission. Half of the recent infections have been among gay and bisexual men. Make sure you are vaccinated for Hepatitis A & B, visit your closest sexual health clinic or GP to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis A Update: Increased cases in NSW

Hepatitis A Update: an increase in cases of Hepatitis transmission have a occurred in NSW, with half the recent infections among gay and bisexual men. Make sure you are vaccinated for Hepatitis A & B, head over to your closest sexual health clinic or GP to get vaccinated. http://bit.ly/2wrf4jn

Posted by Ending HIV on Monday, September 18, 2017

 
Hepatitis A is an acute infection (short-term but often severe) that causes inflammation of the liver. It’s not a very common virus in Australia, although NSW has recently seen an increase in new hepatitis A infections.

Hepatitis A is usually passed on when:

 

How can I tell if I have hepatitis A?

The best way to find out if you have hepatitis A is to get tested. Some symptoms may include:

 
If you have hepatitis A, you are considered infectious for a week after the onset of your symptoms. Symptoms can last for two weeks to two months, Some people, especially children, don’t get sick when they catch hepatitis A. Hepatitis A doesn’t cause a chronic (long-term) infection, and most people recover completely.

How do I get tested for hepatitis A?

You will be given a blood test to see if you have contracted hepatitis A. Once you have had hepatitis A, you will become immune to it, meaning you cannot get it again.

How can I get treated?

There is no medical treatment for hepatitis A. However, it’s recommended you rest and drink plenty of fluids and water, avoid alcohol and try to eat a well-balanced, low-fat diet.

How can I prevent getting hepatitis A?

You can get a two-dose vaccination course to protect you from getting hepatitis A. The second dose is given 6 to 12 months after the initial vaccination.

You can also get a hepatitis A and B combination vaccination, and in this instance, three doses of the vaccine are required.

Also, to prevent contracting hepatitis A, make sure you wash your hands thoroughly after going to the toilet, and before and after sex (especially arse play), and you can also consider using dams when you’re rimming.

What if I’m HIV positive?

If you’re poz, it’s recommended to keep up to date with your vaccinations (both A and B).

If I’m HIV negative and on PrEP, how will Hepatitis A affect me?

PrEP is a highly effective tool in the prevention of HIV, however it does not protect you from hepatitis A. One of the best ways to prevent hepatitis A is to get vaccinated.

FAST FACTS ABOUT HEPATITIS A

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