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Here at Ending HIV we get a lot of questions about sexual health. So, before you submit your question, check if it has already been answered. Can’t find it? Submit it below and one of our peer experts will get back to you.

Ending HIV is a sexual health campaign for gay, bisexual and other guys who have sex with guys, based in NSW, Australia. As such, we prioritise questions received in relation to these communities. If you are living overseas or in another state, there may be limits to the support we can provide. While our peers are highly knowledgeable, they can’t give specific medical advice. Whatever your concern, always seek the advice of a doctor or trained medical professional you trust.

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I would like to get tested and get prescriptions for PReP but in my area of peak hill nsw and there dont seem to be any anywhere in my area

Hi there, thanks for your question. While it may seem challenging at first to find a location to test and get a script for PrEP, the good news is that any doctor, even your local GP, can do all necessary testing and writing of a script for PrEP for you. It’s worth noting though that while any doctor can prescribe PrEP, each of them will have varying levels of understanding of PrEP. So to help navigate the conversation, check out our blog article here: https://endinghiv.org.au/blog/talking-about-prep-with-your-doctor/ which includes a link to a downloadable letter with all the information that your doctor needs (such as what to screen you for and what to write on the script). It might also help to call the doctor in advance to ask their knowledge around PrEP and gauge your comfortability with them. If you have any concerns or run in to any issues with finding and talking to a doctor, you can call the NSW Sexual Health Info Link on 1800 451 624 who may be able to offer further assistance.

Hi l used PEP for a month after being exposed to hiv after tested negative two weeks after the treatment. Then l tried to have protected sex with someone else the condom broke just before penetration l decided to take her for hiv test and l found out that she was positive.l again started PEP right there My question is what are my chances of infecting my wife while on Pep when l still test negative

Hi, Thanks for your question. We highly recommend you don’t have unprotected sex with any partners while you are still on your course of PEP treatment. Although your test results may be appearing as ‘negative’ at the moment, tests for HIV have a window period of between 2 weeks and 3 months depending on the test. This is the amount of time it takes for a reactive result to appear in a HIV test after being exposed to HIV. It’s important for you to complete your course of PEP and then follow up with another HIV test to confirm your HIV status. If you are looking to have sex during this time, we recommend you use condoms to prevent any HIV transmissions. If you have further questions around PEP and HIV risk, we recommend you consult with the health professionals who prescribed you your PEP. Also, if you’re having issues with condoms breaking during sex, we also recommend checking out our website where we give you all the information on how to use condoms correctly, and what the appropriate lubes to use to prevent breakages in the future: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/all-about-condoms/. If you live in NSW and have further questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a nurse can answer your questions over the phone. u78i

Had sex last May unprotected what are my chances

Hi, Thanks for your question. Having unprotected sex with another person who’s HIV status is unknown is high risk for HIV transmission as well as the transmission of other STIs. You can use our Risk Calculator here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/risk-calculator/. Today, there are many highly effective HIV prevention strategies which you can choose from to protect yourself. They include condoms, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and undetectable viral load (UVL). We always recommend using at least one of these forms of protection when you are having sex. You can read more about them on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/. If for whatever reason you do end up having sex with someone and didn’t use one of these strategies, then we would recommend you consider post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). PEP is a 4-week course of anti-HIV treatment someone can take after they have possibly been exposed to HIV in order to prevent an infection. PEP must be started with 72 hours of possible exposure for it to be effective. It can be found at sexual health clinics or emergency hospital departments. We highly recommend you get tested for HIV and STIs as soon as possible with your doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you’ve continued to be sexually active, we recommend getting tested as part of your routine 4 times a year (every 3 months) so that you are always aware of your HIV status. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/. If you live in NSW and have further questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Hi...i had sex with a sex worker 2 days back..we did it once with condom..condom was intact..now im on PEP what are my chances of getting hiv...considering she is positive..?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Your risk for HIV transmission is very low. When used correctly with lube, condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV transmissions. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is also effective in preventing HIV transmissions when started within 72 hours of your possible exposure to HIV, and if you adhere to the 4-week course of treatment. For people who are living with HIV, if they are on effective treatment they can suppress their viral loads to such low levels we call it ‘undetectable viral load’ (UVL). HIV positive people with a UVL cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person, and in fact, UVL is a highly effective HIV prevention strategy. This might be something to think about if you do have sex with HIV positive people in the future. You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. If you have further questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

I’ve had sex with Person Who’s Undetectable, we used condom but it broke. I’ve started PEP immediately but still have some kind of symptoms of HIV. What i have to do?

Hi, Thanks for your question. People living with HIV who are on treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person. Along with condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), UVL is also a highly effective HIV prevention strategy. You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. However, it’s still good to hear that you are aware of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and are having control over your own health by accessing it. You should finish the 4-week course of treatment that has been prescribed to you. Symptoms for HIV can also look very similar to symptoms caused by other things. If you are experiencing any persistent symptoms and/or are looking for further medical advice, we would recommend getting in touch with your doctor. If you have further sexual health questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

After a possible hiv risk ( not insertive sex ) when fore-playing and dry humping ... could i get infected from breast fluid or getting fluid pass the underwear to my mouth or penis ? I’ve done a rapid test at 5 month mark and 6 month mark , and a i guess an elisa test at around 7 month mark all came negative ... do i need to test one more time ?!

Hi, Thanks for your question. For HIV to be transmitted, it requires bodily fluids (semen, blood, anal fluids, front hole or vaginal fluids, or breastmilk) from a person living with HIV who is not on treatment to enter the bloodstream of a HIV negative person. Often this is through fucking/being fucked or sharing injecting equipment. This means that the risk of HIV being transmitted in the way that you’ve described would be considered highly unlikely. You can read more about HIV, how it transmitted and how to prevent infections on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/sti/hiv/. For your question around testing, tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes for a reactive result to appear in the test after possible exposure to HIV. This means that your tests at 5 months, 6 months and 7 months all sit outside the window period, and your negative results are conclusive for your HIV status. If you’ve continued to be sexually active you will need to get tested again. You can read more about testing on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ If you have more questions and live in NSW, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

where could i find a Prep?

Hi, That’s a good question. If you are an Australian resident with Medicare, you can access PrEP by asking your doctor or general practitioner. They will test you for HIV to confirm your HIV status before writing you script which you can take to any pharmacy to purchase PrEP at a subsidised cost. If you don’t have access to Medicare, you’re still able to purchase a generic version of the drug online from a reliable overseas supplier. You will still need a script from your doctor before ordering online. You can check out the PrEP Access Now website to find out more information on the different suppliers you can import PrEP from here: https://www.pan.org.au/ If you have more questions and live in NSW, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Is it okay to take preps although i have Epegastric Ulcers. Coz i really have Stomach cramps.

Hi, Thanks for your question. For medical advice and questions around PrEP and its interactions with your existing conditions, we recommend consulting with your doctor or a health professional who specialises in HIV. For other sexual health questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

i am hepatitis b carrier but not active , my PCR test result is 2000 , my doctor told me i dont need to take any medication , my question is : can i take PrEp for preventing from HIV ?

Hi, Thanks for your question. People living with hepatitis B are still able to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV transmissions. For people living with chronic hepatitis B infection who are taking PrEP, AFAO recommends that their dosing strategy is daily PrEP and not on-demand PrEP: https://www.afao.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/AFAO-On-Demand-PrEP-Fact-Sheet.pdf If you are thinking about taking PrEP, we recommend consulting with your doctor or health professional who specialises in HIV and Hepatitis B to discuss if PrEP is an effective option for you and how to correctly use it. If you have further questions, you can call the NSW Hepatitis Infoline at 1800 803 990 where a person can answer your questions. You can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer further questions over the phone.