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Hi, its there a way I can get prep without having to go and see a doctor.

Hi, That’s a really good question. To access PrEP you will need to visit a doctor or health professional who specialises in HIV. They will need to have a consultation with you and test you for HIV to confirm you are HIV negative before they prescribe you PrEP. You will also need to have your consultation and HIV test every 3 months with your doctor in order to renew your scripts. If you are Medicare-eligible, the you can take that script to the pharmacy to pick up your PrEP at a subsidised cost. If you do not have Medicare, you can also buy generic versions of the medication online from reliable suppliers, which can be found on the PrEP Access Now website: https://www.pan.org.au/. You will still need your script from a doctor before purchasing. Although any doctor can prescribe you PrEP, it is important you are seeing a doctor who you feel comfortable talking about your sexual history with. If you’re looking for a doctor who can prescribe you PrEP or would like to ask more questions about PrEP before seeing a doctor, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone. The NSW STIs Programs Unit also has a list of gay-friendly GPs, which you can use if it is applicable to you: https://stipu.nsw.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/4.-Gay-Friendly-GP-List_February-2018.pdf

Fucked a man while wearing a condom,am I at risk of getting hiv

Hi, Thanks for your question. When used correctly, condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and STI transmissions. You can read more about condoms and how to correctly use them on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/all-about-condoms/ However, there are some STIs, such as syphilis, which can be transmitted from skin-to-skin contact, and although condoms are great at offering protection, there can sometimes still be a chance of STIs transmitted while wearing condoms. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs four times a year with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/ If you have more questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Hello my names Byron, in the last six months I have had some alopecia and with new treatment options we are looking at JAK inhibitors. I have taken Prep in the past but currently am not engaged in activities so have chosen to not take it. After an appointment with a specialist he is concerned with how prep would interact and there is little research to prove these two drugs work together?! Is there more information you can provide that these drugs could work together or don’t?! Kind regards Byron

Hi Byron, That’s a really good question. Unfortunately, we don’t have this specific information you’re looking for. We would recommend continuing to consult with your specialist and also a doctor or health professional that specialises in HIV and HIV treatment, who can provide you with more medical advice.

Can you get hiv from a female face sitting and she rubs her vaginal fluids on your whole face.. eyes and nose. Nose was also inside the vagina. She also came on my face and mouth.

Hi, Thanks for your question. HIV predominantly exists in blood, semen, anal fluids and vaginal/front hole fluids. For HIV transmission to occur, it requires one of these fluids from someone with HIV to enter a HIV negative person’s bloodstream. Often, this means HIV is transmitted through unprotected penetrative sex or sharing injecting equipment. Although the sex you described suggests that HIV can hypothetically be transmitted if your sexual partner is HIV positive with a detectable viral load, and her vaginal fluids entered your body through the mucous membrane of your eyes, this is highly unlikely. If you are still concerned we would recommend you speak to a sexual health nurse or your local doctor. However, we recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have regular sexual health check-ups with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/

Hi. I'm currently on daily PrEP. Since we're currently in lockdown, and I'm isolating by myself, sex isn't really an option. Is it safe to stop taking daily PrEP and move onto a PrEP on demand schedule?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Yes, it is a very strange time and unprecedented time. Because of the current situation and guidelines by health experts around social distancing, we strongly discourage casual sex, and it’s great to hear that you’re already practicing this! However, this doesn’t mean we discourage sexual pleasure at all, and you can read more on our blog how to enjoy sexual pleasure during the era of COVID-19 here: https://endinghiv.org.au/blog/covid-19/ In terms of thinking about changing your PrEP dosing from daily to on-demand, we recommend calling your doctor who prescribes you your PrEP to provide you with medical advice and further discuss what options are best for you. If you have any other questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

I took profilaxis for only a week, before that I tested three monts later and six months later, my question is: this results are reliable

Hi, Thanks for your question. HIV tests can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the test. This is the period of time it takes from any possible exposure to HIV to show a reactive result in the test. This means that your test results at 3 months and 6 months after your possible exposure are conclusive for your HIV status. However, if you have had sex since then, you will need to test again. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to get tested for HIV and STIs 4 times a year. You can read more about HIV testing and the window period here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ Also, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is most effective after it is taken once a day for 7 days, and continues to be highly affective when taken daily. You can read more about PrEP here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/prep/ For post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), it is most effective when started with 72 hours of possible exposure, and when the 4-week course of treatment is completed. You can read more about PEP here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/pep/ If you were using either PrEP or PEP, it is important to make sure you are adhering to these dosing guidelines. If you are having trouble with adherence, it is best to further discuss with your doctor how you can better follow these guidelines. If you have further questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

I just topped a girl anally for 1 minute without comdom and not deep Can i catch hiv like that i dont know her status

Hi, thank you for your question. The risk involved would be low to medium as no preventative measures were taken, and you don’t know your sexual partners status. Our advice would be to seek out medical advice on whether or not you would qualify for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). You can do so by calling the PEP hotline on 1800 457 624.

I have just completed the PEP 28 day regimen . I took it after 60 hours of my supposed exposure , I have had odd symptoms like loss of appetite, sore muscles and joints , fatigue , congestion ,etc while on the medication I assumed the worst and thought this was my serconversion because it all seemed to stop around the same time but I was tested the 12th and got my results back the 15th negative/non-reactive. And I have what feels like sore muscles and joints now . Is it accurate to say that after my HIV test I am clear of HIV? is my mind playing tricks on me?

Hi, Thanks for your message. It’s great to hear that you accessed PEP after your possible exposure. PEP is highly effective in preventing HIV transmission when started within 72 hours after possible exposure. Tests for HIV can have a window period of between 2 weeks to 3 months depending on the HIV test, so it is always important to get another test after this window period to confirm your HIV status. You can read more about testing and the window period on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/all-about-testing/ Also, symptoms for HIV can be very similar to other things, and it is possible the symptoms you’re experiencing can be because of something else. We always recommend seeking further medical advice from your doctor or health professional.

I have been sex with condom may I have risk for hiv

Hi, Thanks for your question. If you have had condomless sex, without any other form of protection such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or undetectable viral load (UVL), with a sexual partner whose HIV status you don’t know, you may be at risk of HIV transmission. You can use the risk calculator on our website to measure the level of risk for HIV transmission here: https://endinghiv.org.au/stay-safe/risk-calculator/. For your situation, we would recommend you accessing post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which is a 4-week course of HIV prevention treatment you can take if you have been possibly exposed to HIV. PEP needs to be taken within 72 hours of the possible exposure for it to be highly effective. You can access PEP by visiting a sexual health clinic or from the emergency department at the hospital. You can also find more information on PEP at the Get PEP website (https://www.getpep.info/) or you can call the PEP Hotline at 1800 737 660 (1800 PEP NOW), where someone can discuss your risk with you over the phone and help you find PEP.