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Here at Ending HIV we get a lot of questions about sexual health. So, before you submit your question, check if it has already been answered. Can’t find it? Submit it below and one of our peer experts will get back to you.

Ending HIV is a sexual health campaign for gay, bisexual and other guys who have sex with guys, based in NSW, Australia. As such, we prioritise questions received in relation to these communities. If you are living overseas or in another state, there may be limits to the support we can provide. While our peers are highly knowledgeable, they can’t give specific medical advice. Whatever your concern, always seek the advice of a doctor or trained medical professional you trust.

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Does hiv antibodies disappear after some years

Hi, Thanks for your question. HIV antibodies will remain in your system after an HIV infection. However, with the effective HIV treatments that are available today, people living with HIV can suppress the viral load of HIV in their bodies to such low levels, we call it ‘undetectable viral load’ (UVL). Although this is not a cure, people living with HIV who sustain a UVL have much better health outcomes and cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person. Even though the viral load of HIV in the body becomes detectable, the antibodies can still be detected. You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. If you have more sexual health questions and you live in NSW, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Hello, my friend (he’s HIV positive) has accidentally used my razor because our razors are same brand. After 12 hours I used it. He’s undetectable for 2 years now. Is there any chance to get HIV from Him? Please answer me.

Hi Thanks for your question. No need to worry! Because your friend is undetectable, there is no risk of HIV being transmitted. People living with HIV who are on treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person. In fact, UVL is one of the most highly effective HIV prevention strategies. You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. If you live in NSW and have further questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624.

Can you tell me how u detectable viral load works? I mean if there’s a 20 cop/ml virus in 1 ml of seam, this virus goes in HIV negative person’s body and goes where? It’s in our body and what if someone have rectal bleeding or something? Is it safe in that case?

Hi, Thanks for your question. When a HIV positive person is taking effective treatment, the viral load of HIV in their bodies get suppressed to such low levels we call it ‘undetectable viral load’ (UVL). A HIV positive person with a UVL not only live healthier lives but they also cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person. This is because there’s not enough HIV in the bodily fluids to cause an infection. This means that there is zero risk for HIV transmission during sex between a HIV positive person with a UVL and a HIV negative person, and that it is safe! Along with condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), UVL is also a highly effective HIV prevention strategy. In fact, there’s been heaps of studies to show this, which you can read more about on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. However, UVL does not prevent other STIs from being transmitted, and the risk can also increase if there is rectal bleeding as you’ve said. We recommend to anyone who’s sexually active to have routine sexual health check-ups (even if they’re showing no symptoms) and to get tested for HIV and STIs 4 times a year (every 3 months) with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/. If you live in NSW and have further sexual health questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

How long does hiv antibodies stay in hiv infected person Does hiv antibodies goes away from infected person blood

Hi, Thank you for your question. If someone is living with HIV they will continue to produce HIV antibodies to fight the virus. The only way to reduce HIV antibodies for someone living with HIV is to start HIV treatment. This is known as anti-retroviral therapy (ART). ART attacks the HIV in a person’s body. This means the amount of anti-bodies produced are significantly less as the medication is fighting the virus, not just the body. In fact, medication these days is so effective, that it can bring a person’s antibody count down to undetectable levels. To learn more about undetectable viral loads please check out this page: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/undetectable-faq/

Hi there. I'm hiv positive and undetectable. I'm a bottom. Last night I noticed small specks of blood on my toilet paper after going to the bathroom. Does this put my partner at risk?

Hi, Thanks for your question. If you are a HIV positive person who is on treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) for at least 6 months, there is zero risk for HIV transmission. Along with condom and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), UVL is also a highly effective HIV prevention strategy. You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. Although UVL is highly effective at preventing HIV transmissions, it doesn’t prevent the transmission of other STIs. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have routine sexual health check-ups and to get tested for HIV/STIs 4 times a year (every 3 months) with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you have further questions, you can also call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a sexual health nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

Can you contract hiv from a positive person with undectable viraload?

Hi, That’s a good question. The answer is nope! A HIV positive person who is on treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person. In fact, along with condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), UVL is also a highly effective HIV prevention strategy, which is great because it means you have more options to choose from! You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/about-undetectable/. If you have further sexual health questions, you can call the Sexual Health Infolink at 1800 451 624 where a nurse can answer your questions over the phone.

If i have hiv but I'm undetectable and I have a sore throat it was bleeding from coughing to much and a hiv positive person with a extremely low count not on meds and has new and older sores on his penis nuts in your mouth and you swallow it what are the risk factors for you and also what about that person using toilet same spoon etc lmk now im freaking out it feels like my throat is closing i threw up and i spit out black stuff and my throat hurts bad

Hi, Thanks for your question. If you are HIV positive and have an undetectable viral load and having unprotected sex with another HIV positive person who is not on treatment and has a detectable viral load, there is a possible risk for you to be reinfected with a different strain of the virus. However, this risk is very rare. Terrence Higgins Trust has more information on when you’re both positive here: https://www.tht.org.uk/hiv-and-sexual-health/living-well-hiv/sex-and-relationships/when-youre-both-positive. HIV cannot be transmitted by sharing the same toilet or spoons. For transmission to occur, it requires blood, semen, rectal fluids or front hole fluids from a HIV positive person who is not on treatment to enter the bloodstream of another person (often through fucking or being fucked or sharing injecting equipment). Although oral sex is considered very low to no risk for HIV transmissions, the risk for reinfection can increase if you have cuts or sores in your mouth. If you’ve had a sore throat, been coughing a lot and blood has been present, and the other person with a detectable viral load has cummed in your mouth, your risk for reinfection may increase as there are more entry points for the virus to enter your bloodstream. There may also be a risk for the transmission of other STIs, so it’s important to make sure you are having routine sexual health check-ups with your doctor or local sexual health clinic. The symptoms you are describing can be caused by other things as well, and we highly recommend seeing a doctor as soon as possible to seek further medical advice, especially if you are spitting up something black, as you described. We also recommend further discussing your risk for reinfection with your doctor who specialises in HIV and seek medical advice from them. If you live in NSW and are looking for more support, Positive Life NSW is a great organisation to reach out to. You can find them at (02) 9206 2177 or contact@positivelife.org.au.

1. How long would an hiv patients under antiviral drug live after being detected at an early stage?

Living with HIV today is a very different story to how it use to be understood. People living with HIV who are on effective treatment today can suppress the viral load of HIV in their bodies to ‘undetectable’ levels. This means that the levels of HIV in their bodies become so low that they cannot transmit HIV to a HIV negative person, and they have much better health outcomes. Their health can be improved even more if treatment is started early soon after diagnosis. This means that people living with HIV today can live long and healthy lives.

Can someone transmit HIV to another person through oral sex precum if that person is undetectable and on medication?

Hi, Thanks for your question. Oral sex is considered very low to no risk for HIV transmissions. However, this can be different for other STIs, which are easily treatable. We recommend to anyone who is sexually active to have regular sexual health check-ups with their doctor or local sexual health clinic. If you live in NSW, you can find the nearest place to get tested here: https://endinghiv.org.au/test-often/where-to-get-tested/. People living with HIV who are on effective treatment and sustaining an undetectable viral load (UVL) cannot transmit HIV to a negative person through any form of sexual activity. In fact, UVL is one of the most effective HIV prevention strategies along with condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). You can read more about UVL on our website here: https://endinghiv.org.au/treat-early/all-about-treatment/