MPXV vaccine registration of interest

MPXV (Monkeypox) Vaccinations: Information for NSW 

This page contains information about the MPXV vaccine and a link to NSW Health to register your interest in the vaccine. 

It is important however that our community stays informed about how MPXV is transmitted and what we can do to prevent MPXV. ACON is providing frequently updated information to help our communities make informed decisions. You can access that information here. 

NSW Health is providing vaccinations for community members at particular risk of exposure to MPXV. The vaccination program commences Monday 8 August. 

The vaccine that will be offered to community members is the JYNNEOS smallpox vaccine, which is the latest vaccine available to provide protection against MPXV.    

Supply of the JYNNEOS vaccine is extremely limited. Currently, there is significant global demand and health authorities are working hard to secure more vaccines. 

Because if this initially limited supply, vaccines are being offered in a phased approach with priority given to those at most risk of MPXV. 

In the first phase, NSW Health will administer 5,500 doses. A further 30,000 doses are expected at the end of September and 70,000 doses in early 2023.    

People wanting to receive the vaccine are asked to register their interest online via NSW Health. Please note: completing the form does not guarantee vaccine access. 

Those determined to be at high risk will receive a clinical assessment to determine their eligibility for the vaccine at this point in time.   

Please be patient as health authorities work through vaccine distribution. As more vaccines become available, more people will be able to get access to the vaccine. 

It is important to be remain self-aware of your health at all times, including after being vaccinated. 

If you develop any symptoms, particularly an unusual rash, lesions or sores, seek medical advice immediately. Call the NSW Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624 or call your GP or local sexual health clinic via phone or telehealth. 

For further information on how to prevent MPXV, click here. 

ACON, along with other community partners, is supporting NSW Health and our communities during the MPXV vaccination program. We are continuing to work with NSW Health towards facilitating greater access to vaccines that protect against MPXV. 

Register your interest via NSW Health

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the JYNNEOS vaccine?

The JYNNEOS vaccine is the vaccine being offered to community members during the monkeypox vaccination program. It is a two-dose vaccine given four weeks apart. It is administered by injection, usually in the upper arm, and is safe to use in people who are immunocompromised.

JYNNEOS is one of two vaccines used for MPXV currently approved in Australia.

The other vaccine, ACAM2000, is associated with rare but serious side effects and adverse events, especially in certain groups of people such as those who are severely immunosuppressed. Because of this, ACAM2000 is not recommended for mass vaccination.

How does the JYNNEOS vaccine work?

The JYNNEOS vaccine is a two-dose vaccine, given at least 28 days apart. A person will start to build protection in the days and weeks after their first dose but will not have full immunity from the vaccine until two weeks after the second dose.

How effective is the JYNNEOS vaccine?

The World Health Organization (WHO) describes the vaccine’s efficacy as 85%, in other words preventing 17 out of every 20 infections. It should be noted that studies have been limited and there is a need to grow the evidence in this area. 

Protection increases in the weeks following your vaccination. Your clinical provider will be able to provide more information.  

What are common side effects of the JYNNEOS vaccine?

Side effects are common but usually mild. Most people have redness, swelling and pain where they get the shot. Tiredness, headache and muscle pain can also occur after vaccination.

Can I have the JYNNEOS vaccine at the same time as a COVID-19 booster/vaccine?

An older version of the smallpox vaccine carries a risk of heart muscle or heart lining inflammation, especially when given at the same time as mRNA vaccines such as those used for COVID-19. It is not known if the vaccine being used during this rollout (JYNNEOS) also carries these risks.

For people at risk of these conditions, such as young adult males, NSW Health recommends spacing their JYNNEOS and mRNA COVID-19 booster/vaccine apart by several weeks. Talk to your doctor for further information.

Is there a vaccination program against MPXV in NSW?

Yes. A targeted vaccination program against MPXV focussing on high-risk groups is being implemented in NSW. The vaccine rollout is being led by NSW Health.

How are the JYNNEOS vaccines being distributed?

There is significant global demand for this vaccine. NSW has received a limited supply from the Commonwealth Government. Because of this initially limited supply, vaccines will be offered in a phased approach with priority given to those most at risk.

Who is eligible for the JYNNEOS vaccine?

Priority groups for the initial phase of the vaccine rollout include gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM); those who would be particularly vulnerable should MPXV become locally endemic, such as MSM who are homeless; sex workers; and high-risk people planning to travel overseas with known MPXV outbreaks.

Those determined to be at high risk will then receive a clinical assessment to determine their eligibility for the vaccine at this point in time.

Do I need a Medicare card to receive the vaccine?

No. While some vaccination sites may ask you to bring a Medicare card along to your appointment, MPXV vaccines are available at no charge to everyone regardless of their Medicare status.

How do I register my interest to receive the vaccine?

People seeking to be vaccinated are asked to register their interest online via NSW Health. Please note: completing the form does not guarantee vaccine access.

We ask that other people who believe they are at risk to be patient so those most at risk are protected first. Further vaccine will be available later in the year.

When and how will I hear about my MPXV vaccine registration?

People who have registered their interest and meet the eligibility criteria for the first stage of the vaccine rollout will receive an SMS from NSW Health over the next few days. The SMS will contain a unique code so that they can book an appointment online.

Those who have registered for the vaccine but are not eligible for the first stage will be contacted by NSW Health in the lead up to the next stage of the rollout that will begin in September 2022, if they are eligible.

I am planning to travel overseas. Should I get the JYNNEOS vaccine?

People who are deemed at high risk of MPXV infection – such as gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men that have a history of multiple sexual partners – who are planning to travel to a country with a significant MPXV outbreak should get vaccinated.

But be sure you plan early and to take into account the limited supply. You will need at least four weeks between your two doses, and another two weeks after your second dose to get full protection from the vaccines.

I think I may have been exposed to MPXV. Am I eligible for the JYNNEOS vaccine?

Anyone categorised by public health authorities as a high risk MPXV contact in the past 14 days should get the vaccine. Speak to your GP or healthcare professional about vaccine access if you are a close contact.

I think I may have symptoms of MPXV. Am I eligible for the JYNNEOS vaccine?

If you have symptoms of MPXV it is important to speak to a healthcare provider first before accessing a vaccine appointment. Contact your regular healthcare provider and let them know before attending that you might be experiencing symptoms.  For support on how to best navigate healthcare settings if you think you have symptoms, call the NSW Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624.

Are more supplies of the JYNNEOS vaccine on their way?

Yes. The federal and state governments are working to secure more supplies of the vaccine. As more vaccines become available, more people can get vaccinated against MPXV.